Area School Information

New home buyers with families are often concerned about the school district in which their children will be living. Keffer Realty has provided the links below to area high schools so that buyers may research the area high schools to make informed decisions when basing their new home location on school district.

If you are interested in purchasing a new home, please call Keffer Realty, one of our professional knowledgeable agents would love to assist you in your new home search.

 

CHESAPEAKE

Deep Creek High School
Grassfield High School
Great Bridge High School
Hickory High School
Indian River High School
Oscar F. Smith High School
Western Branch High School

HAMPTON

Bethel High School
Hampton High School
Kecoughtan High School
Phoebus High School

NEWPORT NEWS

Denbigh High School
Heritage High School
Menchville High School
Warwick High School
Woodside High School

NORFOLK

Booker T. Washington High School
Granby High School
Lake Taylor High School
Matthew Fontaine “Maury” High School
Norview High School

PORTSMOUTH

Churchland High School
I. C. Norcom High School
Woodrow Wilson High School

SUFFOLK

King’s Fork High School
Lakeland High School
Nansemond River High School

VIRGINIA BEACH

Bayside High School
First Colonial High School
Floyd “Kellam” High School
Frank W. “Cox” High School
Green Run High School
Kempsville High School (Homes for Sale NearBy)
Landstown High School
Ocean Lakes High School
Princess Anne High School
Salem High School
Tallwood High School

WILLIAMSBURG

JAMES CITY COUNTY

Jamestown High School
Lafayette High School
Warhill High School

YORK COUNTY

Bruton High School
Grafton High School
Tabb High School
York High School

ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY

Smithfield High School
Windsor High School

POQUOSON CITY

Poquoson High School

GLOUCESTER COUNTY

Gloucester High School

ACCOMACK COUNTY

Arcadia High School
Chincoteague High School
Nandua High School

NORTHAMPTON COUNTY

Northampton High School

FRANKLIN CITY

Franklin High School

SURRY COUNTY

Surry County High School

SOUTHAMPTON COUNTY

Southampton High School

AREA PRIVATE SCHOOLS

*This list of public high schools was obtained from the Virginia Department of Education website for the 2009-2010 school year. Additional schools may have been added in the area.  Private school information was obtained from WAVY NEWS Channel 10 website

Please remember, all homes and properties are subject to school redistricting, no agent can promise otherwise. Purchasing a home specifically because of the school district it is located in, does not guarantee that the city or county will not change district boundaries. Buyers should always contact the local school boards to be certain if the home they are choosing is within the school district they desire. The school board may be able to assist you with questions regarding upcoming redistricting.

Why do we call it Norfolk ?

Norfolk did not begin it’s English speaking history with its present name.

The site of the future City of Norfolk was contained on one of the original eight counties created by the first settlers in 1634, who named it Elizabeth City County after Queen Elizabeth.

Three years later, the county was reorganized into Upper Norfolk County (later re-named Nansemond County, and now part of the City of Suffolk) and Lower Norfolk County.

Lower Norfolk County was comprised of what later became Norfolk, Portsmouth, Virginia Beach and Chesapeake.

That same year, a land grant in the area was given to Henry Lord Maltravers, a great grandson of the 4th Duke of Norfolk, and even though he never claimed his grant, which later reverted to the crown, it is believed his family’s royal connection via the Duke of Norfolk was the source of the counties names. Therefrom the name of the city later developed along the Elizabeth River… Norfolk.

There is another theory that Capt Adam Thorowgood (Thoroughgood), an early prominent settler, named the county after his original home in Norfolk County, England.

Whichever story is true, one can spot a present native of Norfolk, and its surrounding environs, by his or her pronunciation of the city’s name in a millisecond; For only interlopers and pretenders ever pronounce it as it phonetically reads. True sons and daughters of the city will ever be from “Nawh-fulk”; accent on the first syllable, passing “l” in the second.

None but a third generation native could possibly render the gentle mellifluous lilt of that southern inflection so effortlessly.

Olde Town Portsmouth


Aren’t we fortunate to have so much history in our back yard?

Named after the English naval port of Portsmouth, England, with the charm of old city streets on the beautiful waterfront of the Elizabeth River, Olde Towne Portsmouth is out to offer a new generation an up-beat tone of life with historic homes, specialty shops, towering churches and over 41 dining options within a mile!

Capt. William Carver was the first known settler in Portsmouth. His land was given to Col. William Crawford around 1715 after Carver was hanged for stabbing Thomas Gilbert. -Hence the street “Crawford Street”, which many of us do business on daily nearly 300 years later.

In 1780 General Benedict Arnold was in command of Portsmouth. The House & Commercial Building located on 300 High Street was his command center. Following Arnold, General Cornwallis took over, but he left to fight Washington and Lafayette at Yorktown.

Due to the perfect location on the banks of the Elizabeth River, Portsmouth boomed with business. By 1794 there were more than 300 homes, and rail lines were built some years later.

Around 1827 the Navy built its first hospital in Portsmouth, which is still in use today. Later, John Porter transformed the USS Merrimac into the CSS Virginia. Where the James River meets the Elizabeth River, the CSS Virginia and the USS Monitor fought. -Hence the name, The Monitor-Merrimac Bridge Tunnel, which is about 4.5 miles long and was completed in 1992 -more than 150 years after the battle. The battle was fought less than a mile from where the Bridge Tunnel stands today.

Today, you can take walks through Old Towne Portsmouth and discover history for yourself, or visit one of the museums in Old Towne for guided tours. Listen to the church bells as you stroll. Trinity Episcopal Church founded in 1762, not only still stands, but still rings its bells. You can take the ferry from Portsmouth over to Town Point Park in Norfolk. Enjoy the breeze sitting by the waterfront of the Elizabeth River.

<

Olde Towne Portsmouth is full of history and thanks to the merchants and vendors, it is again full of life and excitement! Portsmouth considers itself “An Official Coast Guard City”.

So, visit Portsmouth today, and all it has to offer! If it looks like a place you would like to call home, then simply call Keffer Realty. Our professional agents will be happy to help you find a Portsmouth home that suits your needs and budget.

Why do we call it Portsmouth, Virginia ?

What would one day be Portsmouth was first sighted by Capt. John Smith in 1608 when he explored the Elizabeth River.

Fifty years later, the land was granted to Captain William Carver for settlement. Carver made a monumental political blunder when he supported Nathaniel Bacon’s bloody rebellion against the tyrannical Governor Berkeley in 1676, by leading a tiny naval squadron in an attempt to blockade Governor Berkeley and his supporters on the eastern shore -to whence they had retreated when Bacon’s motley army over-ran Williamsburg.

Bacon died shortly thereafter, and the rebellion disintegrated. Governor Berkeley was not in a forgiving mood and hanged Capt. Carver for his role in the thing. Upon his death title to his lands reverted to the crown.

In 1716, the lands formerly owned by Carver were granted to Col. William Crawford, a prominent local citizen and politician.

In 1752, Crawford platted 65 acres of his holdings into 122 building lots and petitioned the General Assembly for authority to establish the “Town of Portsmouth.”

He undoubtedly copied the name from that great seaport, Portsmouth, England, probably in hopes his town would become a prosperous seaport.

Crawford built his home on the main street of the new town, which became known, and remains known, as Crawford Street.

Why is Richmond the capital of Virginia ?

Jamestown, the first permanent settlement in America, was the first capital of Virginia. But the marshy peninsula on which it sat was unsuitable for a more expansive city, and the capital was soon moved to higher ground in Williamsburg.

In the early days of the Virginia colony, when all settlement was on the banks of navigable waterways on the eastern seaboard, Williamsburg was perfectly sited. But as settlements moved westward and the colony’s borders ran west to the Mississippi River, and as far north as Pittsburgh and Detroit, there arose a sentiment to move the capital to a more central location as early as the mid 1700′s.

Thomas Jefferson, who had not liked the city since his college days at William & Mary College, introduced a bill in the 1776 revolutionary legislature to move the capital, but it was defeated by a vote of 62 to 38.

Re-introduced in each of the succeeding legislatures, the bill was defeated, though by declining majorities.

Finally, in 1779, with the realization that the capital was exposed to easy attack from the British Navy, and with Jefferson’s insistence, the legislature voted to move the capital. Richmond, Staunton, Fredericksburg, and Charlottesville were all considered as possible sites, but Richmond won.

Jefferson envisaged a grand capital with magnificent buildings, a scheme that many of his fellow Virginians found odd in the middle of a revolution whose outcome had not yet been decided. Jefferson was persuaded to scale down his grandiose plans. Land confiscated from loyalists was reserved for capital buildings on Shockoe Hill, where the present state capital stands.

Removal of the state capital from Williamsburg to Richmond did not remove the danger of British attack. For in its first year, a British force lead by Benedict Arnold, the famous American turncoat, led a raiding party up the James River to Richmond. Government papers were quickly rowed across the river to Manchester (now southside Richmond) for safekeeping. Arnold’s army occupied the city for a couple of days, burned a few buildings, scattered state papers hither-thither and departed down river.

A bill was introduced in the legislature the following session to move the capital again, but was defeated. The capital has been in Richmond ever since

Why we drive on the right

It’s a good thing Henry Ford waited until he did to start making automobiles because early settlers couldn’t have used them. There were no roads and Tin Lizzies didn’t float.

The earliest most extensive road system was developed around Lancaster, Pa connecting the farm villages of gregarious German folk -who enjoyed the social pleasures of church and beer drinking, sometimes simultaneously.

Some enterprising fella in nearby Conestoga, Pennsylvania began building wagons to take advantage of the multiplying paths. These odd wagons had curved floors to keep the load from sliding around as they went up and down hills and were designed to float when crossing streams and boasted a Granny style canvas bonnet to keep the goods dry in rainy weather. With a few modifications they became the famous “Prairie Schooners” that moved America west.

These unique wagons were so popular for getting farm products to Philadelphia and Lancaster that the roads became a bit crowded and America’s first traffic jams caused a bit of Pennsylvania Dutch cussing and carrying on as each navigated the road under his own rules.

The solution was to agree to some traffic rules such as speed limits, right of way precedence and which side of the road one traveled. Excepting the introduction of traffic signals and radar, the rules of the road around Lancaster have changed very little over the centuries -and they still drive on the right side of the road.

Why do we call it Kitty Hawk

Located just north of Kill Devil Hills on the Outer Banks of North Carolina, Kitty Hawk has been permanently settled since the mid 1700′s and has been known as “Kitty Hawk”, though with various and inventive spellings, (Kittyhuk, Kitty Hark) since that time.

The name may be derived from an Indian name for the place because maps from 1738 call it “Chickehauk”.

Another theory is that it comes from the large number of mosquito hawks found in the area and it was originally called “Skeeter Hawk” and from that, “Kitty Hawk.”

But the most popular theory is that it derives from local Indian pidgin that referred to the time of geese migration, and good hunting, to “Killy Honk” or “Killy Honker”, thence to “Killy Hawk”, and finally “Kitty Hawk”

Old Towne Portsmouth

Just across the water from Norfolk’s Waterside is Portsmouth. Named after the English naval port of Portsmouth, England, the charm of old city streets on the beautiful waterfront of the Elizabeth River, Olde Towne Portsmouth is out to offer a new generation an up-beat tone of life with historic homes, specialty shops, towering churches and over 41 dining options within a mile!

Capt. William Carver was the first known settler in Portsmouth. His land was given to Col. William Crawford around 1715 after Carver was hanged for stabbing Thomas Gilbert. -Hence the street “Crawford Street”.

In 1780 General Benedict Arnold was in command of Portsmouth. The House & Commercial Building located on 300 High Street was his command center. Following Arnold, General Cornwallis took over, but he left to fight Washington and Lafayette at Yorktown.

Due to the perfect location on the banks of the Elizabeth River, Portsmouth boomed with business. By 1794 there were more than 300 homes, and rail lines were built some years later.

Around 1827 the Navy built its first hospital in Portsmouth, which is still in use today. Later, John Porter transformed the USS Merrimac into the CSS Virginia. Where the James River meets the Elizabeth River, the CSS Virginia and the USS Monitor fought. -Hence the name, The Monitor-Merrimac.

Today, you can take walks through Old Towne Portsmouth and discover history for yourself, or visit one of the museums in Old Towne for guided tours. Listen to the church bells as you stroll, Trinity Episcopal Church founded in 1762, not only still stands, but still rings its bells. You can take the ferry from Portsmouth over to Town Point Park in Norfolk. Enjoy the breeze sitting by the waterfront of the Elizabeth River.

Olde Towne Portsmouth is full of history and thanks to the merchants and vendors, it is again full of life and excitement!

Why we call it Norfolk

Norfolk did not begin it’s English speaking history with its present name.

The site of the future City of Norfolk was contained on one of the original eight counties created by the first settlers in 1634, who named it Elizabeth City County after Queen Elizabeth.

Three years later, the county was reorganized into Upper Norfolk County (later re-named Nansemond County, and now part of the City of Suffolk) and Lower Norfolk County.

Lower Norfolk County was comprised of what later became Norfolk, Portsmouth, Virginia Beach and Chesapeake.

That same year, a land grant in the area was given to Henry Lord Maltravers, a great grandson of the 4th Duke of Norfolk, and even though he never claimed his grant, which later reverted to the crown, it is believed his family’s royal connection via the Duke of Norfolk was the source of the counties names. Therefrom the name of the city later developed along the Elizabeth River… Norfolk.

There is another theory that Capt Adam Thorowgood (Thoroughgood), an early prominent settler, named the county after his original home in Norfolk County, England.

Whichever story is true, one can spot a present native of Norfolk, and its surrounding environs, by his or her pronunciation of the city’s name in a millisecond; For only interlopers and pretenders ever pronounce it as it phonetically reads. True sons and daughters of the city will ever be from “Nawh-fulk”; accent on the first syllable, passing “l” in the second.

None but a third generation native could possibly render the gentle mellifluous lilt of that southern inflection so effortlessly.

Why we call it Chesapeake

Have you ever told someone out of town who’s never been to Tidewater that you live in Chesapeake and have them begin exclaiming jealousy at your good fortune to live along the seashore of the bay? And then see their confusion when you tell them Chesapeake doesn’t adjoin the bay at all, anywhere?

Well, back in 1963 when Norfolk County and South Norfolk merged, one of the problems was what to name the new city. The city founders held an election in which any name receiving a petition with 100 signatures could be put on the ballot.

It was obvious early on that “Chesapeake” was the mild favorite but it wasn’t a particular favorite of the leading politicians who hoped somebody would come up more of a zinger. Many of the politicos lived in Great Bridge and liked the name and the area and there was a mini boomlet for “Great Bridge” as the election approached.

One might think that naming a city would be important business to its citizens but only 1662 people bothered to vote. “Chesapeake” took 1274 of the votes. “Great Bridge” trailed in a distant second with 171 votes. Some of the names on the ballot received only 1 or 2 votes. Among the choices on the ballot that day were: Bridgeport, Chesapeake, Churchland, Glendale, Glennville, Gosport, Great Bridge, Norcova, Port Elizabeth, Sunray City, Virginia City, and Woodford.

Despite Chesapeake’s present land-locked location some distance from its namesake bay there is an old connection. Chesapeake formed part of the original Norfolk County grant that comprised much of tidewater and did indeed border the Chesapeake Bay. The oldest deeds from the original charter now reside in the Chesapeake Clerk’s office.


Warning: include(/home/kefferr/public_html/test/links.htm): failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home4/akeffer/public_html/wp-content/themes/agentpress/footer.php on line 20

Warning: include(): Failed opening '/home/kefferr/public_html/test/links.htm' for inclusion (include_path='.:/opt/php54/lib/php') in /home4/akeffer/public_html/wp-content/themes/agentpress/footer.php on line 20
Sitemap Local | Privacy Policy | Sitemap IDX
Alan M. Keffer | Broker | 409 Slate Street | Chesapeake, Virginia | 23322
Push 2 Check